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Conj 532 – “Signal Transduction: From the cell membrane to the nucleus”

T739,  MWF,  12:30 PM – 1:30 PM      Dates:   Oct 29 - Dec 13,  2012

 

Lecture #

Day

Date

Tentative Schedule of Lecture Topics

Lecturer

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

M

Oct 29

Introduction to course

J Scott

 

2

W

Oct 31

Basic elements of signal transduction systems

 

J Scott

 

3

F

Nov 2

Protein-protein coupling and G protein coupling

 

J Scott

4

M

Nov 5

 

cAMP pathway and compartmentalized signaling

 

J Scott

5

W

Nov 7

Nitric oxide/CO/cGMP signaling pathways

J. Beavo

 

6

F

Nov 9

Insulin, IGF-1, IRS signaling

 

J Beavo

 

M

Nov 12

Veterans Day Holiday – Nov 12

 

 

7

W

Nov 14

Cross talk between cAMP and MAPK signaling

D. Storm

 

8

F

Nov 16

Molecular and Cellular Basis of Memory Formation I

D. Storm

 

9

M

Nov 19

Molecular and Cellular Basis of Memory Formation II

 

D. Storm

10

W

Nov 21

Chemosensory mechanisms

 

D. Storm

 

F

Nov 23

Thanksgiving Break - Nov 22-23

 

 

11

M

Nov 26

Cytokine/Jak/Stat signaling pathways

 

J. Beavo

12

W

Nov 28

Proteolysis and signal transduction:

Hedgehog and Notch signaling pathways

R Moon

 

13

F

Nov 30

Proteolysis and signal transduction:

   WNT –1 signaling

R Moon

 

14

M

Dec 3

Signal Transduction Therapies

J. Scott

 

15

W

Dec 5

Signaling pathways in developmental biology

 

R. Moon

Final Exam

Thurs

8:30 AM

Dec 13

In Class Final Exam – Final date not yet firm so please do not make holiday plane reservations until we find out for sure.   Tentatively in Room T739 at 8:30 AM (ouch)

 

 

 

 

 

 


Course Administration: The course will be administrated by Drs. Joe Beavo (F404), Dan Storm (J681F) and staff in the Department of Pharmacology in the Health Sciences Bldg.  Any comments or questions about the course can be directed to Drs. Beavo or Storm.  There will also be lectures by Drs. John Scott and Randy Moon.

 

Textbooks: There will be no required textbook for the course although you may find any recent Molecular Cell Biology or Cell Biology text helpful if you do not have a good background in signal transduction.  We expect the students to have a basic understanding of biochemistry and cell biology as one would get in a typical 400 level undergraduate course on the subject.  Each week a series of several research papers and/or reviews will be assigned.  Students are expected to read these manuscripts BEFORE class.

 

Handouts:  Handouts containing abbreviated versions of parts of the material to be covered will be given out for most lectures and be available on the Web site.  Often these will contain outline copies of most of the more complex figures used in lecture particularly if they are not included in the assigned reading papers.  Where possible, pdf reprints of relevant papers will also be provided at the course Web site  (http://courses.washington.edu/conj532/).

 

Discussion sessions: Every few lectures the instructor will include as part of their lecture a short discussion of a new and/or somewhat controversial series of papers in the area being covered.  The students will be given the papers in the week before the lecture and also a series of questions related to them.  They will be expected to hand in answers to these study questions at the BEGINNING of the discussion lecture.  The answers are to be typed and no longer than 1 page (double spaced, 12 pt font, 0.7 inch margins).  These written answers will be used as the basis for 50% of the final grade in the course.  When possible part of the class time will be devoted to discussion of possible answers to the questions.  Note, often times more than one correct answer is possible.   You can work together on discussing these questions, but we expect the final written answer to be YOURS.

 

Exams:  There will be one major exam, the final.  This exam will be in the form of short answer essay questions.  The exam will be held in the lecture hall during the finals week.  Because of the essay format, it is unlikely that final grades will be available immediately but will be posted on the web as soon as possible.

 

Grades:  Grades will be based on the cumulative results of the discussion questions and on the final exam.  The final will count for 50% of the grade and the cumulative written analysis for 50%.

 

Faculty:

Dr. Joe Beavo                                                                                           Dr. Daniel Storm                            

F404A, 543-4006                                                                                   J681F, 543-7028                              

beavo@u.washington.edu                                                               dstorm@u.washington.edu      

 

Dr. Randall T. Moon                                                                           Dr. John Scott

SLU Campus, Rm S524                                                                   HSB K-336B

206- 543-1722                                                                                          206-616-3340

rtmoon@u.washington.edu                                                            scottjdw@u.washington.edu