ENVIR/ECON 235, Winter 2008
Introduction to environmental economics




Announcements

* Here's a spreadsheet of final grades. (Please let me know if you find any errors that cost you points that you deserve.) And here's the 3rd midterm (and the answer key) and the comprehensive final (and the answer key).

* Here are the cheat sheets for the 3rd midterm and for the comprehensive final. Also, here's the supply-and-demand worksheet we did in class last week. An answer key is on the second page. And here is midterm 1 (and the answer key, and the cheat sheet), and here is midterm 2 (and the answer key).

* Wednesday (the last day of class) we'll do a course review and discuss any other environmental economics topics you want to discuss.

* If you weren't in class yesterday for course evaluations (or if you were and have other thoughts), you can send kudos/criticisms/suggestions/etc my way via this anonymous feedback form on UMail.

* Here is a spreadsheet of grades from Exam #1, listed by the last 4 digits of your student ID. The mean and median were both around 83%, just under a 3.0. (As ballpark estimates: the cut-off for a 3.0 will be 85%, the cut-off for a 2.0 will be 70%, the cut-off for a 1.0 will be 55%.) Please come see me if you have questions about the exam or the grading. And remember that you can always take the comprehensive final to try to improve your grade.



Wikipedia project

Week 1: Familiarize yourself with Wikipedia. I am no expert, but that's kind of the point. A good place to start is the Introduction page. Read about Wikipedia, go through the Tutorial, and register a username. You should also begin a diary to record your activities. (You're supposed to put in 20 hours over the course of the quarter.)

Week 2: Joint editing of a new page on climate change in Washington State.

Week 3 and beyond: Additional edits on the Washington State page, or creation of pages for other states or other topics as discussed in class! Make sure to keep a diary record of your activities.


Syllabus and basic info

* Here is the syllabus and here's a class discussion board. My office hours are Mondays 9:30-11:30 in MGH 274F or by appointment or email.

Help make the class better by giving me feedback. If you don't want to be identified, use UMail to send me anonymous feedback, but please note that since I won't know who you are I won't be able to send out an individual response.

* Tutoring help is available from the Economics Undergraduate Board (see in particular their tutoring schedule and note that they're in Condon Hall over by Lander), from CLUE, and from the Math Study Center (which also provides links to private math tutors). If you know of additional tutoring resources, let me know and I'll give you extra credit (because you're contributing to the class).

Tentative class schedule

Week 1 – (starting Monday Jan 7)
M Chapter 1 (and the big question)
W Chapter 2 (risk and climate change)

Week 2 – (starting Monday Jan 14)
M Chapter 3 (and discounting issues) -- bring a calculator
W Chapter 4 (and capital theory) -- bring a calculator

Week 3 – (starting Monday Jan 21)
M No class (Martin Luther King Day)
W Chapter 5 and exam

Week 4 – (starting Monday Jan 28)
M Chapter 6 (and permit allocations)
W Chapter 7 (and cost-benefit analysis)

Week 5 – (starting Monday Feb 4)
M Chapter 8
W Chapter 9 (Tragedy of the Commons)

Week 6 – (starting Monday Feb 11)
M Chapter 10 (permit auctions)
W Chapter 11 (marine affairs)

Week 7 – (starting Monday Feb 18)
M No class (Presidents Day)
W Chapter 12 and exam

Week 8 – (starting Monday Feb 25)
M Chapter 13
W Chapter 14 (and carbon taxes)

Week 9 – (starting Monday Mar 3)
M Chapter 15
W Chapter 16

Week 10 – (starting Monday Mar 10)
M Chapter 17 (and externalities)
W Chapter 18 (double dividend)

Final Exam – Tuesday, Mar 18, 2:30-4:20
As noted above on page 1, you can choose to take a comprehensive final exam or a midterm exam that covers only Part III of the text..


Old announcements

* Here is an old version of the cheat sheet for the first midterm (which is on Wednesday the 23rd). Email me if there are other things you'd like to see on the cheat sheet. Please note that "Challenge" problems are not fair game for the exam---the exam will focus on the core material. (My apologies if I failed to make this clear earlier.)

* Please bring the following items to class tomorrow (Wednesday): a calculator, a pen or pencil, and your Wikipedia diary. Please also think about whether you'd like to continue working on the current Wikipedia page (on economic impacts of climate change in Washington State) or whether you'd like to investigate a different topic (and, if so, what kind of topic). Because of the exam and the holiday on Monday, your Wikipedia task for the week is limited to these two activities (sending me your diary and thinking about what you'd like to work on next). If you don't get this notice in time and can't bring your diary to class, please bring it or email it to me the next chance you get.

* I am very happy with recent contributions to the Wikipedia page---thank you for your efforts on this, and keep it up! (PS. Although the page is still under consideration for deletion, I'm pretty confident that the battle is almost won :)

* Here are PDFs from week 1's intro to climate change and climate in WA and expected value calculations lectures. More info on climate change can be found in the the 2007 IPCC reports, from which I particularly recommend the IPCC Working Group 1 FAQs (2007). The full report on economic impacts of climate change in Washington State can be found linked from the Wikipedia page--see below.

* The required textbook is Quantum Microeconomics, which you can download for free online (note that this is a large file) or buy at the Ave Copy Center (on the west side of the Ave, just south of 42nd) for about $25.

* If you have your clicker on Wednesday, bring it to class, and if your clicker doesn't give you a green light during class polling times then please come see me after class.You must also have a Turning Point radio-frequency "clicker" for use during lectures. (They look like this and are sold at the textbook counter in the bookstore. If you already have one or can buy an appropriate clicker that works from somewhere else--e.g., another student, or somewhere on the web--that's fine too.) You must register your clicker here. (Ignore the fact that this webpage says ENVIR 100, not ENVIR 235 :) Failure to register your clicker before class on Monday Jan 14 will negatively affect your grade.

* For this week, your only Wikipedia task is to go to the class discussion board and indicate what you'd like to work on for the rest of the quarter. If you want to continue working on the page on economic impacts of climate change in Washington State, great. If you want to work on something else, that's great too. (And it doesn't have to be a Wikipedia page--if you'd rather you can just do a paper on an environmental economics topic of your choice. But it would be cool if you could make a contribution to Wikipedia.) Also: If you didn't turn in your diary to me on Wednesday and haven't emailed it to me yet, please do so.

* Here is the lecture (PDF and PPT) about the market for lemons. Note that Wednesday's midterm will focus on chapters 6-11.

* Here is a spreadsheet of grades from Exam #1, listed by the last 4 digits of your student ID. And here is the exam itself, and an answer key. The mean and median were both around 83%, just under a 3.0. (As ballpark estimates: the cut-off for a 3.0 will be 85%, the cut-off for a 2.0 will be 70%, the cut-off for a 1.0 will be 55%.) We'll discuss the exam briefly on Monday, but please come see me if you have questions about the exam or the grading. And remember that you can always take the comprehensive final to try to improve your grade.

Send mail to: yoram@u.washington.edu
Last modified: 3/24/2008 6:23 AM