Organization and Scope Lecture ScheduleLab ScheduleBooksGradingHelpful FilesLinks

 

Ted Pietsch, Instructor, Office: Fisheries Teaching and Research, FTR 203. Telephone 543-8923, e-mail: twp@uw.edu.  Office hours: just stop by or make an appointment via e-mail.

 

Alicia Godersky, Teaching Assistant for Lab Section AA, Wednesday-Friday afternoons; e-mail: garnet13@uw.edu; assisted by Undergraduate Peer-TA Sydni Baumgart, e-mail: sydbaum@uw.edu. Office: the UW Fish Collection, Fisheries Teaching and Research, FTR 005. Office hours: TBA.

 

Jeremy Harris, Teaching Assistant for Lab Section AB, Tuesday-Thursday afternoons; e-mail: jph77@uw.edu. Office: the UW Fish Collection, Fisheries Teaching and Research, FTR 005. Office hours: TBA.

 

Sarah Friedman and Jennifer Gardner, Undergraduate Peer-Teaching Assistants for Lab Section AC, Tuesday-Thursday mornings. e-mail: sarahsea@uw.edu and jgardn92@uw.edu. Office: the UW Fish Collection, Fisheries Teaching and Research, FTR 005. Office hours: TBA.


Organization and Scope

 

Fish 311 is an introductory course designed to provide an overview of the wonderful world of fishes, their kinds and ways. We’ll discuss and conduct a hands-on examination of the biology and diversity of living fishes of the world—from ancient bottom-living hagfishes and lampreys to modern-day sharks, rays, and bony fishes; from the freshwaters of Amazonia and to mangrove swamps and coral reefs; and from shallow-water lakes and streams to the deepest parts of the world's oceans.

 

Schedule

 

Lecture notes are available for download in pdf format (Adobe Acrobat Reader required). For "note-taking" format, click on "Notes."

 

 

Monday

January 6

Introduction: organization and scope of the course; definitions; major themes: form, function, and biodiversity; major groups of fishes. Notes

 

Chapter 1

Wednesday

January 8

1. Form: External anatomy; body shape and size; fins, spines, and scales; evolutionary trends in body form. Notes

 

Chapters 1, 3

Friday

January 10

2. Biodiversity: Numbers and kinds of fishes; diversity through time; taxonomy, systematics, and classification; major groups of fishes. Notes

 

Chapter 2

Monday

January 13

3. Form and function: Origin and kinds of bone; evolution of skeletal systems; functional units of the fish skeleton. Notes

 

Chapter 3

Wednesday

January 15

4. Function: Locomotory mechanisms; anguilliform versus carangiform swimming; non-swimming locomotion; the functions of fins. Notes

 

Chapter 8

Friday

January 17

5. Form and function: Airbladder evolution and structure; swimbladders and buoyancy; respiration and sound production. Notes

 

Chapter 4

Monday

January 20

 

Holiday: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

 

 

Wednesday

January 22

6. Biodiversity: Methods and goals of systematics; phenetics, evolutionary systematics, and cladistics. Notes

 

Chapter 2

Friday

January 24

7. Biodiversity I: Jawless fishes; sharks and their allies; evolutionary successes and failures. Notes

 

Chapters 11, 12

Monday

January 27

8. Biodiversity II: Primitive bony fishes and the rise of modern teleosts. Notes

 

Chapter 13

Wednesday

January 29

 

Lecture Examination I

Friday

January 31

9. Form and function: Feeding modes and mechanisms; biomechanical considerations; upper jaw mobility and evolutionary success. Notes

 

Chapter 8

Monday

February 3

10. Form and function: Feeding modes and mechanisms continued: how fishes get their mouths open and closed. Notes

 

Chapter 8

Wednesday

February 5

Taxonomy, systematics, and fisheries management: North Pacific skates, rockfishes, and snailfishes as case studies.

 

 

Friday

February 7

11. Biodiversity III: Trends in teleost evolution; primitive teleosts and the rise of euteleost fishes. Notes

 

Chapter 8

Monday

February 10

12. Biodiversity IV: Primitive euteleosts and the rise of acanthomorph fishes. Notes

 

Chapter 14

Wednesday

February 12

13. Form and function: Modes of reproduction; functional anatomy; unique strategies and adaptations; parental care. Notes

 

Chapter 20

Friday

February 14

14. Form and function: Osmoregulation, water and ionic balance in diverse aquatic environments. Notes

 

Chapter 7

Monday

February 17

Holiday: President's Day

 

 

 

Wednesday

February 19

15. Function: Respiration; buccal and opercular pumps; structure and function of gills; air-breathing fishes. Notes

 

Chapter 5

Friday

February 21

 

16. Biodiversity V: Acanthopterygian fishes and derivative orders; morphology, ecology, and co-evolution. Notes

 

 

Chapter 15

Monday

February 24

17. Form, function, and biodiversity: Early life history, eggs and larvae, techniques and approaches, ontogeny and phylogeny. Notes

 

Chapter 9

Wednesday

February 26

 

Lecture Examination II

Friday

February 28

18. Biodiversity VI: Sarcopterygian fishes; video on the story of Latimeria. Notes

 

Chapter 13

Monday

March 3

19. Biodiversity VII: Deep-sea fishes: biodiversity and bioluminescence in Earth's largest ecosystem. Notes

 

Chapter 17

Wednesday

March 5

20. Form and function, sensory perception I: Smell and taste; hearing and the acoustico-lateralis system. Notes

 

Chapter 6

Friday

March 7

Otoliths: What are they, what do they do, and why are they important?

 

 

Monday

March 10

 

21. Form and function, sensory perception II: Eyes and vision; visual pigments and color vision. Notes

 

Chapter 6

Wednesday

March 12

 

22. Form and function, sensory perception III: Electric organs and electroreception; object location and identification; electrocommunication. Notes

 

Chapter 6

Friday

March 14

 

 

23. Biodiversity: Distribution and zoogeography; marine zoogeographic regions and barriers; dispersal versus vicariance. Notes

 

 

Chapter 16

 

Wednesday

March 19

Comprehensive Final Examination 2:30-4:20 pm, FSH 102


Books

 

While no single text is required for the course, it is highly recommended that you use the following as a supplement to the lecture and laboratory material: Gene S. Helfman, B. B. Collette, D. E. Facey, and B. W. Bowen. 2009. The Diversity of Fishes: Biology, Evolution, and Ecology. Second Edition. Blackwell Science, Malden, Massachusetts, xiv + 720 pp.

 

Another book that will be useful to you, especially if you are interested in knowing about the different kind of fishes, is the following: Nelson, Joseph S. 2006. Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, xvii + 601 pp.

 

Grades and Grading

 

Lecture only

     

Lecture and laboratory

Points

Lecture Exam I

Lecture Exam II

Clicker quizzes

Comprehensive Lecture Final

 

100

100

100

300

Lecture Exam I

Lecture Exam II

Clicker quizzes

Comprehensive Lecture Final

 

100

100

100

300

 

 

Midterm Lab Exam

Laboratory Notebook

Quizzes

Comprehensive Lab Final

 

100

50

50

200

 

Totals

600

1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helpful Files●

 

Phylogeny Tutorial (PDF)

Phylogeny 1 (PDF)

Phylogeny 2 (PDF)

Trees (PDF)

Linnean Hierarchy (PDF)

Scientific Terminology (PDF)

Names and Naming (PDF)

Fossil Fishes (PDF)

Geological Time (PDF)

Otoliths (PDF)

Anatomical Terminology (PDF)

Sample Exam (PDF)

 

Links

 

UW Academic Conduct and Disability Information

UW Fish Collection

Web of Science (via UW Library)

Catalog of Fishes

FishBase

SAFS Homepage

Burke Museum

Vertebrate pages on the Tree of Life

Gilbert Ichthyological Society

UW Biology

American Society of Ichthyologists
and Herpetologist

NOAA's Ichthyoplankton
Information System

Marine Biology at UW

 

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