Current Issues in Restoration Ecology and Environmental Horticulture

Journal Club (AUTUMN 2017)

Welcome!  We meet on Fridays from 4-5 pm in DRC 103.

Discussions are facilitated by:

· Jon Bakker

· Kern Ewing

· Jim Fridley

· Soo-Hyung Kim

 

Important Course Logistics and Expectations:

· In week 1, sign up for leading a discussion.

· As it approaches your week to lead,

a. Consult with at least one faculty to get your paper approved by the Friday prior to your discussion

b. Once approved, send your paper to Jon by noon Monday for posting on the web

c. Send discussion questions to course email list by noon Wednesday.

· Sign in each week as you participate in the discussion

a. Should you miss a discussion, please email one of the faculty with your own summary and discussion questions of the week prior to your absence to receive credit for participation.

b. Alternatively, you may post your summary and questions on the discussion board below.

 

Course email list: sefs503a_au17@uw.edu.  Please use your UW account!  If you do not use your UW account, delivery will be delayed until the email has been approved.

 

Discussion Board

A discussion board for Journal Club is available here.  It can be used in many ways:

· Weekly leaders can post questions or comments before class to guide our reading (and the in-class discussion).

· People can continue discussions beyond class time.

· Folk that have to be in the field or are sick can still participate.

· Folk can post relevant articles.

Date

Leaders

Topic

Reading

Notes

9/29

Joe

Invasive species

Crooks. 2005. Lag times and exotic species: the ecology and management of biological invasions in slow-motion. Écoscience 12:316-329.

Optional supplemental reading: Reichard & White. 2001. Horticulture as a pathway of invasive plant introductions in the United States. BioScience 51:103-113.

Student responsibilities and expectations document is here.

10/6

Derek, Lila

Beneficial insects

Ramsden et al. 2015. Optimizing field margins for biocontrol services: the relative role of aphid abundance, annual floral resources, and overwinter habitat in enhancing aphid natural enemies. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 199:94-104.

Supplemental: Williams et al. 2011. Bees in disturbed habitats use, but do not prefer, alien plants. Basic and Applied Ecology 12:332-341.

 

10/13

Anne-Gi

GIS

Kauffman-Axelrod & Steinberg. 2010. Development and application of an automated GIS based evaluation to prioritize wetland restoration opportunities. Wetlands 30:437-448 (plus supplementary materials).

 

10/20

Kyra, Stephen

Prairies

Clare Ryan: Class / MEH capstone opportunity (SEFS 571)

Taylor & Santelmann. 2014. Comparing vegetation and soils of remnant and restored wetland prairies in the northern Willamette Valley. Northwest Science 88:329-343.

Supplemental: Christy & Alverson. 2011. Historical vegetation of the Willamette Valley, Oregon, circa 1850. Northwest Science 85:93-107.

 

10/27

Sarah, Ellison

Urban ecology

Shwartz et al. 2014. Enhancing urban biodiversity and its influence on city-dwellers: an experiment. Biological Conservation 171:82-90 (plus supplementary materials).

Supplemental: Standish et al. 2013. Improving city life: options for ecological restoration in urban landscapes and how these might influence interactions between people and nature. Landscape Ecology 28:1213-1221.

 

11/3

Jonathan P., Hannah

Riparian buffers

Wahl et al. 2013. Impacts of land use at the catchment scale constrain the habitat benefits of stream riparian buffers. Freshwater Biology 58:2310-2324 (plus supplementary materials).

Supplemental: Ferris et al. 2012. Determining effective riparian buffer width for nonnative plant exclusion and habitat enhancement. International Journal of Ecology 2012(170931):1-7.

 

11/10

 

 

No Class—Veterans Day Holiday

 

11/17

Jon B., Sage

Seed sourcing

Harrison et al. 2017. Integrating climate change and habitat fragmentation to identify candidate seed sources for ecological restoration. Restoration Ecology 25:524-531 (plus supplementary materials).

 

11/24

 

 

No Class—Thanksgiving Break

 

12/1

Whitney, Arthur

Russian olive

Colette & Pither. 2015. Modeling the potential North American distribution of Russian olive, an invader of riparian ecosystems. Plant Ecology 216:1371-1383.

Supplemental: Nackley et al. 2013. Bioenergy that supports ecological restoration. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 11:535-540.

 

12/8

Scott

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Schedules

 

 

2016-17

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2015-16

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2014-15

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2013-14

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2012-13

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2011-12

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2010-11

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2009-10

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

2008-09

Autumn

Winter

Spring

 

 

 

 

Contact: sefs503@uw.edu

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