UW SPH | UW SoM | UW Home |
Environmental Change and Human Health: The Role of the Health Professional
 
Course Overview

UCONJ 540 will not be offered in Winter Quarter 2012.

CHECK BACK LATER FOR NEW DATES

Field Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

UCONJ 540 Instructors:
Kees Kolff: kkolff@olympus.net
Mark Oberle: moberle@u.washington.edu
Roger Rosenblatt: rosenb@u.washington.edu

Administrative contact: Mark Oberle: moberle@u.washington.edu

Class Format: Lecture discussions and field trip, with a 1 or 2 credit option.
Credit/Non-credit.

1 Credit: Attend and participate in the lecture discussions and field trip and do the readings.
2 Credits: In addition, tackle a problem-based, real-life case that will emerge from the field trip, and present your work to the class.

Time: This course has one weekend field trip to Port Townsend and 3 lecture/discussion sessions

Lecture Location: Lectures will be held in UW - Health Sciences Building.

Course Activity Fee: of $80 will defray field trip costs (transportation, hostel for one night, plus Saturday dinner and Sunday breakfast and lunch). Please check back later for details of the field trip itinerary. Check out field trip photos from a prior field trip at link to the left.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a UW health science school;
Undergraduates and others may be admitted with instructor's permission.

UW course registration add code: Contact Mark Oberle in the UW Dept. of Health Services for course registration add code and for other questions.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course, students should be able to:
1. Describe accepted facts and discuss different stakeholder perspectives about a specific controversy in environmental change and human health;
2. Identify possible solutions to one problem in environmental change and human health;
3. Describe the use of carbon footprint and ecological footprint calculations;
4. Write a 'letter to the editor' about the case-study problem;
5. Review and comment on other students' letters to the editor.

 

 

The School of Public Health's logo (Soul Catcher) is a Northwest Coast Indian symbol of physical and mental well-being.